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LazyLibrarian, Calibre, Calibre-Web, Booksonic Installation Guide v1.0

Here's a guide to help you install a nice library suite on a Linux system. Not in a Docker. Not on Windows. Linux. Plain old Debian Linux. I know some of you want to run it in Docker, or on a Synology, or on Windows. I know nothing about any of that. Sorry. This is a more or less step by step guide to install.
If you follow this, please read through the whole thing first. There are some things that should come in a certain order to make life easier. I've tried to call out options where they are available and give some reasoning behind my choices.
I do NOT have all of the answers. And my choices are not always correct for me, let alone for you.
Hopefully coming soon will be some short guides for things you'll encounter after the installation (why won't my audiobooks import, why aren't calibre entries being written, etc.) As well as an inevitable edit of this guide once all of the flaws and shortcomings have been located.
To get started, you need a Linux installation. I'm assuming a plain vanilla install of Debian that you've booted into once, updated packages, and rebooted if necessary. Not sure if it matters, but I'm running it in a VM. Currently giving the system 4GB of RAM, 4 processors, and 70 GB of space, NOT counting space for the library. The RAM only rarely comes into play. The processors almost never come into play. At some point, I'll dial them both down by half or more. The disc space looks kinda ridiculous. In retrospect, 20-30 is probably more than enough, but I'm still figuring our the room for metadata.
(For comparison, I have 28GB of eBooks at the moment, as well as 164 GB of audiobooks. (Note to self: look into that. Database reporting in LazyLibrarian says I only have 624 books and 263 audio. That amount of disk space seems a bit much. Difference between du and df is interesting.))
Information and items to have before you start (* is mandatory, O is optional):
  • * -Location of helpers like SABNZB, qbittorrent, etc.
  • * -Intended Directory layout. More on this later
  • * -IP address and hostname of your library server (this should be statically set, or you may have issues later) (for this document, we are assuming 192.168.1.100 and hostname librarian)
  • O -Bot accounts on your favorite IRC servers if you like.
  • O -GoodReads account.
  • O -Kindle email to device address

Distribution Choice

I prefer Debian based distros due to simplicity. Usually I go for Ubuntu (because everyone does, it makes it trivial to specific directions). For my library, I went with vanilla Debian. There are some changes in how Ubuntu handles certificates that aren't well documented and that I didn't feel like figuring out. This guide will be based on Debian Buster.
I haven't gotten around yet to playing with Docker. Sometime in the next year, I hope to do that. If you need Docker help, gotta ask someone besides me. This is a guide to putting a library on (virtual) metal.
Required additional packages
  • git (For installing/updating.)
  • xvfb (Required to do a few things with calibre. Most importantly, this is required if you didn't install a gui on your system)
  • python3-pip (Not every python package is prepackaged.)
  • libnss, python3-openssl, python3-oauth (Agh, lost my notes as to why we need this.)
Optional packages
  • openssh-server (unless you are logging in locally or solely through VNC, which I don't recommend.)
  • cifs-utils (if you are using a Samba/SMB share. No, it's not recommended, we're doing it anyway.)
  • imagemagick, ghostscript, python3-pythonmagick, python3-wand (for generating covers and the like)
  • rename (helps manipulate filenames, because ebook and audiobook naming is awful)
  • id3v2 and id3tool (helps manipulate id3 tags because ebook and audiobook tagging is awful. Supposedly id3 v1 is sufficient, but you really need the v2 tool. If you are a super miser on space, skip id3tool)
  • unzip (another file/metadata helper)
Audiobook related packages
  • ffmpeg
To grab all of these:
apt install git xvfb python3-pip libnss python3-openssl python3-oauth openssh-server cifs-utils imagemagick rename id3v2 id3tool unzip ffmpeg
User creation
You need to set up a user just to run the services. On this setup and for this guide, our user is 'librarian'. I shouldn't have, but did set it up as a normal user, but with a couple of adjustments.
adduser librarian --system --group
Your screen should give you something like this:
Adding system user `librarian' (UID 109) ... Adding new group `librarian' (GID 116) ... Adding new user `librarian' (UID 109) with group `librarian' ... 
Take note of the UID and GID numbers. We'll come back to that later.

Directory setup

You will need several directories to exist before you begin the installations.
/home/librarian should already exist. If not, make sure you have a 'librarian' user and group. Then create the directory and assign ownership to your librarian user:
mkdir /home/librarian
chown -R librarian:librarian /home/librarian
If you don't have the usegroup, try creating them again.
Most of the server stuff I want in /srv. If it doesn't exist, /opt is another choice. And back in the day, /uslocal did the trick. This guide uses /srv.
Almost all of my data lies on network mounts. In my case, I use samba/SMB. Unfortunately, calibre does not deal with this very well due to samba/SMB not handling file locks well. So far it's mostly ok if you follow my steps and mounting options. The 'not mostly' part is that every so often you may need to reboot the system.
Filesystems are automounted. You'll have to edit your /etc/fstab file. This is a typical line for my mounts:
//fileserveebooks /mnt/ebooks cifs uid=109,gid=116,credentials=/root/creds,vers=2.1,auto,x-systemd.automount,_netdev,mfsymlinks,nobrl 0 0 
Fileserver is the smb name for the fileserver where the data resides.
/ebooks is the name of the share.
/mnt/ebooks is the location that our librarian system goes to in order to find those files.
cifs merely specifies the kind of fileshare we are using
uid and gid must match the numbers from your 'librarian' user and group. This will make that user and group own the mount and be able to do just about anything with the files.
credentials=/root/creds specifies the location of your smb username and password. You could put the info here, but this provides a little extra security. The /root/creds file should look like this:
Username=BigBadLibrarian Password=s00p3rsekr1+ 
Or whatever your credentials are.
vers=2.1 may be unneccessary or may need changing depending on your client and server to get the compatibility right.
The next two sections make the mount happen automatically at startup, after the network comes up.
The last two sections "mfsymlinks,nobrl" are two options that minimize the locking problem earlier. It's not perfect, but it's the best that can be done.
What directories do you need?
  • /mnt/ebooks/ebooks is where we will put our ebooks (naturally)
  • /mnt/ebooks/audiobooks is for audiobooks
  • /mnt/ebooks/comics is for comics (which are beyond the scope of this document)
  • /mnt/downloads is where our torrent and nzb downloader will place completed downloads. I strongly suggest you place them all here. You can separate them if you wish, but at some point, it's not worth the extra effort of defining things out too finely.
  • /mnt/manual_import is where we will place files that we want to bring in manually. Suppose you copy some files from your ereader or a thumb drive. You drop them into this folder. (In my case, the data is on the file server. I mount it as drive N: on my desktop and as /mnt/manual_import on my librarian. Drop it on the desktop, it appears on the server.)
  • /home/librarian/logs is where we will keep our logs. This isn't the best location (should be /valog/librarian or similar) but this will do for now.
  • /home/librarian/.config/calibre/ is where we will keep some configuration bits, including the user database.

Install calibre-server

Long story short: follow the directions here: https://calibre-ebook.com/download_linux
More info:
A stock install should have the correct tools and dependencies already installed.
Run this on the command line: "sudo -v && wget -nv -O- https://download.calibre-ebook.com/linux-installer.sh | sudo sh /dev/stdin"
This will fetch the calibre installer and run it, placing items in stock locations (/opt/calibre). This is perfectly acceptable.
Now we need a sample file to use to force calibre to create its database. This command will grab the freely available "Hearts of Darkness" from Project Gutenberg. Feel free to grab whatever you like:
sudo wget http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/219.epub.noimages -O heart.epub
Take note of where the file 'heart.pub' is located. I will assume it is in /mnt/manual_import. Whatever directory you choose, life is simpler if you have only one sample epub in there. Next, issue the following command:
sudo xvfb-run calibredb add /mnt/manual_import/* --library-path /mnt/ebooks/ebooks
Change the two directories that start with "/mnt" to your location of heart.epub that you just downloaded and the location where you want your calibre database.
Calibre will run just enough to create a database. The computer should take a few seconds and then come back with "Added book ids: 1". If you look in your library folder, there should be a folder labelled 'Joseph Conrad' (or the author of the book you downloaded) as well as a file named metadata.db.
So now we have our basic database. Some people are leaving us now, as that's a key sticking point. Next step is to verify that the server works. Enter the following command: "sudo calibre-server --port=8180 --enable-local-write /mnt/ebooks/ebooks" Then open up a browser and go to "http://192.168.1.100:8180". You should be able to 'browse' around a bit, seeing your massive one author and single book. That's enough. Go back to the screen where you last were at the command prompt, and press control-c to end the task.
We are going to have some logging in our install. Create the log file and set permissions with these commands: "sudo touch /home/librarian/logs/calibre.log && sudo chown -R librarian:librarian /home/librarian/logs/calibre.log"
We will have separate users for our install. It's not strictly necessary now, but might be down the road.
Create the user database and enter your first user by entering this: "sudo calibre-server --userdb /home/librarian/.config/calibre/server-users.sqlite --manage-users"
Create a library user. We assume username "librarian" and password "password" for this example. Don't type the quotation marks. In addition, give this user rights to all libraries in case you added another. Add another user if you like and provide credentials as well as what library you want that user to have access to.
Next we will need a service file to get calibre-server running at every boot. Using your favorite text editor, edit /etc/systemd/system/calibre-server.service.
Mine looks like this (lines that are comments start with an octothorpe '#'. You can leave them or delete the entire line):
[Unit] Description=calibre content server #this can be anything you want After=remote-fs.target #this prevents calibre from starting until after network shares are mounted. If you are storing everything locally, change remote to local [Service] Type=simple User=librarian Group=librarian #previous two lines should reflect the name of the user and group you set above ExecStart=/usbin/calibre-server \ #this should be your calibre executable. You can display it by typing "which calibre-server" at the command prompt. /mnt/ebooks/ebooks/ \ #your library location --enable-auth \ #if you set up authentication as we did. If you REALLY don't want it, delete previous line or comment it out --userdb="/home/librarian/.config/calibre/server-users.sqlite" \ #location of the database we set above --log="/home/librarian/logs/calibre.log" \ #location of the log file we set above --max-log-size=2 #maximum size of the log in megabytes Restart=on-failure #If it crashes or has certain problems, it will try to restart RestartSec=30 #Tunes restarting of the service [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target #We only want this if we are running services. Not in a single user mode for system. Even if you are the only user, it has nothing to do with this line. Don't touch unless you know what you're doing. 
Reload your services configuration with "systemctl daemon-reload" and attempt to start the server with "systemctl start calibre-server"
Wait 10-30 seconds (it take a bit to get going) and investigate with "systemctl status calibre-server" or "ps ax | grep calibre" or both. The systemctl method is preferred. The beginning of roughly the third line of output should look like:
Active: active (running) 
Stop the service with "systemctl stop calibre-server". Check status. It should no longer say 'Running'. Start the service again. Wait a minute or two. At least as much time as it takes to type the next two commands. Check status. At the end of roughly the third line, there should be a time. It should display a time roughly equal to the last time you issued the command with start. A minute or two.
Now restart the service with "systemctl restart calibre-server" and after no more than about five seconds, issue the status command. The time at the end should be roughly five seconds. If it still says a minute or more, wait 10 seconds and try again. If it still shows an odd time, try the stop command, see if it stops, like it did before. Something isn't right.
And now to make it start on every boot, use the command "systemctl enable calibre-server". You can reboot, wait a minute or so, and then issue the status command to see if it started up ok. (I know there's an easier way than a reboot, but I rarely use it with VMs, so I'm not looking it up now.)
You can go read your copy of Hearts of Darkness (a solid book, btw), take a rest, or forge on.

Install calibre-web (optional but recommended)

This is completely optional but oh so desireable. As good as what calibre does, the author is not as good at UX as he is at other things. The marketplace of ideas stepped in and provided us with calibre-web. It is simply a different front end to calibre. If you like the basic server, you can skip this section.
Download a copy of the software. Currently located at https://github.com/janeczku/calibre-web/archive/master.zip. easiest way is to change to the /srv/ directory and type "wget https://github.com/janeczku/calibre-web/archive/master.zip" and hit enter. Then 'unzip master.zip'. There is now a directory named "calibre-web-master". Change it to "calibre-web" with "mv calibre-web-master calibre-web". Then assign ownership of this folder to your librarian with "chown -R librarian:librarian calibre-web"
Change into that directory. At this point you can largely follow the instructions here, beginning at step 3: https://github.com/janeczku/calibre-web/wiki/How-To:Install-Calibre-web-(-Python3-)-in-Linux-Mint-20---Linux-Mint-19-in-Linux-Mint-20---Linux-Mint-19).
  1. 1Install requirements with "sudo python3 -m pip install --system --target vendor -r requirements.txt"
  2. Run calibre-web with "sudo -u librarian python3 /srv/calibre-web/cps.py"
  3. Leave it running and do not close the terminal.
  4. Go to "http://192.168.1.100:8083" in your browser. You login username is admin and password is admin123
After logging in, you'll be presented with a wizard to help you setup your server. A screenshot of some of that is here: https://github.com/janeczku/calibre-web/wiki
At this point you can setup the startup script or you can keep setting up calibre-web. The startup script will be used even if you have to wipe this out and reinstall what you have so far. OTOH, you won't have to bother with the startup script if you decide you hate the interface and don't want it.
Walk through the setup wizard, filling in as much information as you can. If you collected the right information regarding paths and filenames you should have it all above.
A few suggestions:
  1. Assign at least one other admin user in case you forget the password after changing it from 'admin123'.
  2. Decide which software is going to take 'lead' for importing books, especially manual imports. I chose LazyLibrarian because it pings calibre which backfills calibre-web. The other options would require more manual intervention from time to time. Not to say that this is free of it. Oh no, the metadata is too bad for that to be possible.
  3. If you have a Kindle, set up email to Kindle. You'll need to look up the address on Amazon's site. You'll need an email sender. (I use Google, which will require you to setup an application password. Searching "gmail application specific password" should get you to directions for that.
You should once again have access to your one beautiful copyright free eBook, Hearts of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad.
Next we will need a service file to get calibre-web running at every boot. Using your favorite text editor, edit /etc/systemd/system/calibre-web.service.
Mine looks like this (lines that are comments start with an octothorpe '#'. You can leave them or delete the entire line):
[Unit] Description=Calibre-Web #any descriptive name you like After=remote-fs.target #this prevents calibre from starting until after network shares are mounted. If you are storing everything locally, change remote to local [Service] Type=simple User=librarian Group=librarian #previous two lines should reflect the name of the user and group you set above ExecStart=/usbin/python3 /srv/calibre-web/cps.py #determine the 'python' part by typing "which python3" at the command line. The cps.py part will be in the directory where everything is installed for calibre-web WorkingDirectory=/srv/calibre-web/ #can be changed to /home/librarian/calibre-web after creating the directory, but specifying this one makes installation and cleanup very tidy. [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target #We only want this if we are running services. Not in a single user mode for system. Even if you are the only user, it has nothing to do with this line. Don't touch unless you know what you're doing. 
One other item of note. If you are keeping calibre-web, you should change your /etc/systemd/system/calibre-server.service file. The line saying "After" should be edited to read "After=calibre-web.service remote-fs.target" for network shares or "After=calibre-web.service local-fs.target" for local data. This makes sure that calibre-web starts firsts, calibre-server second. If it happens the other way around, calibre-web will not be able to access the database.
Reload your services configuration with "systemctl daemon-reload" and attempt to start the server with "systemctl start calibre-web"
Wait 10-30 seconds (it take a bit to get going) and investigate with "systemctl status calibre-web" or "ps ax | grep calibre-web" or both. The systemctl method is preferred. The beginning of roughly the third line of output should look like "Active: active (running)".
Stop the service with "systemctl stop calibre-web". Check status. It should no longer say 'Running'. Start the service again. Wait a minute or two. At least as much time as it takes to type the next two commands. Check status. At the end of roughly the third line, there should be a time. It should display a time roughly equal to the last time you issued the command with start. A minute or two.
Now restart the service with "systemctl restart calibre-web" and after no more than about five seconds, issue the status command. The time at the end should be roughly five seconds. If it still says a minute or more, wait 10 seconds and try again. If it still shows an odd time, try the stop command, see if it stops, like it did before. Something isn't right.
And now to make it start on every boot, use the command "systemctl enable calibre-web". You can reboot, wait a minute or so, and then issue the status command to see if it started up ok. (I know there's an easier way than a reboot, but I rarely use it with VMs, so I'm not looking it up now.)
Again, if you prefer the other interface, this one is optional. You can 'uninstall' it at this point by deleting /srv/calibre-web/ and going on about your life.
You can go read your copy of Hearts of Darkness (a solid book, btw), take a rest, or forge on.

Install lazylibrarian

Switch to /srv or wherever you want your installation executables and configs to go. Get the current source by entering the command: "git clone https://gitlab.com/LazyLibrarian/LazyLibrarian.git". This should create a directory named LazyLibrarian in the /srv directory. Start the program by running "python LazyLibrarian.py -d". If it crashes or provides errors, you probably are missing some required libraries. Double check the list above.
Cancel the program with control-c. Set ownership of the directory with "chown -R librarian:librarian /srv/LazyLibrarian". Start the program again, this time by running "sudo -u librarian python LazyLibrarian.py -d". Open a browser window and go to http://192.168.1.100:5299. Cancel the program with control-c. If you saw something, we need to make it start up automatically. If it didn't start or you have errors, now is the time to fix them.
We will need a service file to get lazylibrarian running at every boot. Using your favorite text editor, edit /etc/systemd/system/lazylibrarian.service.
Mine looks like this (lines that are comments start with an octothorpe '#'. You can leave them or delete the entire line):
[Unit] Description=LazyLibrarian After=network.target [Service] ExecStart=/usbin/python3 /srv/LazyLibrarian/LazyLibrarian.py Type=simple User=librarian Group=librarian Restart=on-failure [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target 
Reload your services configuration with "systemctl daemon-reload" and attempt to start the server with "systemctl start lazylibrarian"
Wait 10-30 seconds (it take a bit to get going) and investigate with "systemctl status lazylibrarian" or "ps ax | grep lazylibrarian" or both. The systemctl method is preferred. The beginning of roughly the third line of output should look like "Active: active (running)".
Stop the service with "systemctl stop lazylibrarian". Check status. It should no longer say 'Running'. Start the service again. Wait a minute or two. At least as much time as it takes to type the next two commands. Check status. At the end of roughly the third line, there should be a time. It should display a time roughly equal to the last time you issued the command with start. A minute or two.
Now restart the service with "systemctl restart lazylibrarian" and after no more than about five seconds, issue the status command. The time at the end should be roughly five seconds. If it still says a minute or more, wait 10 seconds and try again. If it still shows an odd time, try the stop command, see if it stops, like it did before. Something isn't right.
And now to make it start on every boot, use the command "systemctl enable lazylibrarian". You can reboot, wait a minute or so, and then issue the status command to see if it started up ok. (I know there's an easier way than a reboot, but I rarely use it with VMs, so I'm not looking it up now.)
Now it's time to configure LazyLibrarian.
Between each tab and subtab on the setup, hit save. It's easy to get lost and forget what you've done, so save often. All that will happen is some errors will get thrown because we won't really have this configured enough to work until 75% done. Similarly, if there's a 'test' button near data you enter, try it. If it throws an error at this stage, it almost certainly won't work for real. Better to fix now than hunt bugs later.
Switch to the config tab in the browser. It's the one with the gear icon. The first subtab is interface. Server details should be blank. Under logs, enter a location for a log file. "/srv/LazyLibrarian/Logs" works well if not already selected. Screenlog should be 500, files set to 10. 99% of people use the bootstrap skin (madeup statistic, but most screenshots online use it.) In the bottom right, untick magazines and comics if you aren't using those features. I'll discuss only ebooks and audiobooks. Most of these settings are personal preference. Set the proxy if your system needs one to reach the internet.
The next subtab is 'Importing'. First column, 'Information Sources'. Easiest source is a GoodReads API key. Go to that site, set it up, and copy the key. (If you don't have one, go to this link https://www.goodreads.com/api/keys provide the required information only, and it will provide the key). Do not enable 'GoodReads Sync' at this time. It's going to require reading and planning. I don't use it because I don't care if GoodReads tracks what I've read. I do care about getting want lists out of GoodReads and we'll do that elsewhere.)
Next is file formats. For each of the three boxes, enter a comma separated list of the file formats you want for a given category. "epub, mobi, pdf" is good for ebooks. The converters and process is most mature. I haven't gotten anything else to work. Maybe some day. Audiobooks works with mp3. I'm trying m4b, but haven't completed my testing with my stack. For now, stick with mp3. Magazines I have no opinion on except that pdfs are common. All of the checkboxes below should be blank for now. After your testing and you are satsified, I suggest adding the checkmarks for the two blacklist options. It will cut down on reloading the same bad files over and over.
Finally, language. Set this for your country. I'm an American English speaker, so I use "en, eng, en-US, en-GB, Unknown". You may not want Unknown unless you are having trouble getting books that should be available in your selected languages. The date display options are personal preference. "$m-$d-$Y" would be typical American date nomenclature. "$Y-$m-$d" probably more popular among Europeans.
Next tab is Downloaders. In this, I'm using SABnzbd+ and qBitTorrent.
For SABnzbd+, setup is straightforward. Enter your SABnzbd+ host's location and port. Credentials for the SABnzbd+ server (not your Usenet provider) and the api key. The API key can be found by clicking the gear icon in SABnzbd+ and then the 'General' tab. Get the api key, not the NZB key. SABnzbd+ should be setup with categories. ebooks should have their own category with a particular location for completed downloads. I have this setup, and the category is 'ebooks' which you enter here. 'Delete from sabnzbd history' is the only ticked box in this column.
For qBitTorrent, setup is pretty similar. Enter your qBitTorrent host's location and port. Enter credentials if needed. Provide category name. The download directory is where the torrent client saves files, but as seen by the lazylibrarian host. If you followed along, this should be '/mnt/downloads'. 'Use Torrent Blackhole' is the only UNticked box in this column.
Providers is the next tab. The content will depend on where you are looking for ebooks.
Priority doesn't have to be set. Use it to favor some providers (they have higher quality books for example) and disfavor others. A provider with a higher score/rating will be used over a lower scored one if the search results are scored at the same value.
Newznab generally provides Usenet searches. Your provider can provide the URL and the key.
Torznab is a way to interface to various torrent search engines using Jackett. Setting that up is beyond the scope of this document. If you've set it up, you should know how to get the data that LazyLibrarian needs here.
RSS/Wishlist feeds are, honestly, an odd little beast. They perform two functions. One is to periodically update a list of torrents available from certain trackers. If you know you need this, enter the rss feed for the url here. Of more interest is the ability to use these as sources for wanted books. If the rss feed is from GoodReads, Amazon, New York Times or Listopia, it will grab that list of books, begin searching, and then download them. I use this for my GoodReads want sync. Find/create a bookshelf on GoodReads. Populate that shelf. Then click on the shelf to show the list. At the bottom of the page, there is a small link labelled 'RSS'. Copy that link. It will be something like: "https://www.goodreads.com/review/list_rss/ANIDENTIFIER?key=AWHOLEBUNCHOFSTUFFTHATCOULDBEUSEDTOIDENTIFYME&shelf=to-read" except the all caps parts will be some identifying code. Paste that link into the RSS URL field in LazyLibrarian. Now, shortly after you add an item to this list in GoodReads, LazyLibrarian will notice and look for the book.
Torrent providers are built in torrent searches. These aren't all always working and or available. Use as needed.
IRC is probably the easiest provider to configure. Most of the time. 'Name' is a simple description. 'Server' is the server hostname, such as 'irc.irchighway.net' or 'irc.undernet.org'. Channel is just that: the name of the channel, including the octothorpe, such as '#ebooks'. The botnick and botpass are fields for servers where you can reserve a bot name. You'll have to look at your irc server and see if this is the case. If so, register the name and password, and enter the credentials here. This isn't universally allowed.
At the bottom of the page is a button marked 'Blocked Providers' There probably are not any right now. As you use LazyLibrarian, if the software encounters issues with a provider, it uses the list here to throttle that connection. If you've fixed something that is paused/throttled/blocked, just come here, open the list, and turn it off. It automatically turns back on if needed.

Install booksonic (optional. Recommended for audiobooks)

Booksonic is a fork of airsonic and runs under java. It serves audiobooks. If not interested, skip it. There are a couple of dependencies, a java runtime and ffmpeg. If installing from scratch, the following command will install them: 'apt install openjdk-8-jre ffmpeg'. There have been a few changes to the development of booksonic since inception. At the time of this writing, download links can be found at: https://booksonic.org/download.
Switch to /srv or wherever you want your installation executables and configs to go. Create a directory named 'booksonic'. Set ownership of the directory with "chown -R librarian:librarian /srv/booksonic". Change into that directory. Download the .war file from the link above. Do not get the 'legacy' link. At the time of this writing, the command to do that is "wget https://github.com/popeen/Booksonic-Aireleases/download/v2009.1.0/booksonic.war" You can quickly test your install by running " java -jar booksonic.war -Dserver.port=4040" and visiting "http://192.168.1.100:4040". If it crashes or provides errors, you probably are missing some required libraries. Double check the list above. If everything looks ok, cancel the program with control-c. delete everything in the /srv/booksonic direct except the .war file. If you accidentally deleted everything, just download a new copy.
Next we will need a service file to get calibre-web running at every boot. Using your favorite text editor, edit /etc/systemd/system/booksonic.service.
Mine looks like this (lines that are comments start with an octothorpe '#'. You can leave them or delete the entire line):
[Unit] Description=Booksonic service [Service] WorkingDirectory=/srv/booksonic ExecStart=/usbin/java -jar /srv/booksonic/booksonic.war #There are a multitude of options here for setting memory usage, ports, etc. Using #this, the url you will visit is http://192.168.1.100:8080. User=librarian Group=librarian Type=simple Restart=on-failure RestartSec=10 [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target 
Reload your services configuration with "systemctl daemon-reload" and attempt to start the server with "systemctl start booksonic"
Wait 10-30 seconds (it take a bit to get going) and investigate with "systemctl status booksonic" or "ps ax | grep booksonic" or both. The systemctl method is preferred. The beginning of roughly the third line of output should look like "Active: active (running)".
Stop the service with "systemctl stop booksonic". Check status. It should no longer say 'Running'. Start the service again. Wait a minute or two. At least as much time as it takes to type the next two commands. Check status. At the end of roughly the third line, there should be a time. It should display a time roughly equal to the last time you issued the command with start. A minute or two.
Now restart the service with "systemctl restart booksonic" and after no more than about five seconds, issue the status command. The time at the end should be roughly five seconds. If it still says a minute or more, wait 10 seconds and try again. If it still shows an odd time, try the stop command, see if it stops, like it did before. Something isn't right.
And now to make it start on every boot, use the command "systemctl enable booksonic". You can reboot, wait a minute or so, and then issue the status command to see if it started up ok. (I know there's an easier way than a reboot, but I rarely use it with VMs, so I'm not looking it up now.)

Conclusion

Now you should have a working install of calibre, calibre-web, lazylibrarian, and booksonic. Go into booksonic, add an author, and add a book. I've found searching for a book using ISBN is the fastest. When you add that book, if the net gods are smiling on you, your system will locate them, download them, and transfer them to calibre. If you chose an audiobook, the same thing should happen except that your book will be available in booksonic.
You will have to determine the legalities moralities of any of this for yourself and your country.
One problem you will encounter is horrible file naming and metadata. Everyone has their own idea about what cataloguing is best, and the files you download may not work well with the programs we've installed. Honestly, their authors have done fantastic work dealing with a very tricky problem. If you find value in this guide and there is interest, I will try to write some shorter guides about how to deal with metadata and other common problem areas encountered with this tool stack.
submitted by Gmhowell to LazyLibrarian

Decent Fly-In Results

Demographics
  • Gender: Male
  • Race/Ethnicity: African American/Black
  • Residence: Texas and Virginia
  • Hooks: URM
Intended Major(s): African American Studies, Pre-Law, something politically/law related if asked for more
Academics
  • GPA/Rank (or percentile): 6.38 W on 6.0 scale in Texas, 4.35W on 4.0 scale in Virginia; in the top 8% of class in Texas, top 4% in Virginia
  • # of Honors/AP/IB/Dual Enrollment/etc.: 8 APs, dual enrollment Spanish and art at CC, rest honors
  • Senior Year Course Load: 6 APs; English Literature and Composition, Calculus AB, Environmental Science, United States Government and Politics, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Economics and Personal Finance (VA graduation requirement)
Standardized Testing
  • SAT/ACT: 1470 Superscore (780 ERW, 690 M); 1440 First time, single-sitting (780 ERW, 660 M) December 2019; only taken twice
  • SAT II: Signed up for August US History and Literature, but were canceled; not taking at all now
  • AP:
2018 Human Geography (5)
2019 Seminar (4), World History (4)
2020 Research (4), English Language and Composition (4), Psychology (4), United States History (3) oof, Physics 1 (1) how fitting
  • Other (ex. IELTS, TOEFL, etc.): none
Extracurriculars/Activities:
Write freelance opinion columns, 10+ reputable publications
Multiple college study abroads in fields of interest
Run a reselling business
Model UN
Orchestra
Tennis
Other clubs too, like Mu Alpha Theta, Student Government, Interact Club
Have fun with activities, never thought about doing things for college really before January
Awards/Honors:
College Board National African American Recognition Program, PSAT award
AP Capstone Diploma
AP Scholar with Distinction
nothing too crazy
Essays/LORs/Interviews:
I would like to think I'm a pretty good essay writer (all of us think the same way), used a cool experience from travel, and related it to my interests and identity. Can't be too bad, used the bones of it for Amherst, Dartmouth, Johns Hopkins, and Penn. Did not vibe with any Swarthmore prompts and wrote a bad essay, not surprised with the results. Did not submit an essay to Williams, so not surprised either. Pro-tip: Use lots of personality and voice in your essays, if the AO couldn't pick you out of a lineup solely based on your essay, rewrite it.
Only Amherst took a LOR--maybe Williams too, I can't remember, but it doesn't matter because I didn't have one when I submitted. The teacher voluntarily let me read and it's pretty good.
Decisions:
  • Acceptances:
Amherst College, Access to Amherst (A2A)
Dartmouth College, Dartmouth Bound (DB)
Johns Hopkins University, Hopkins Online Multicultural Experience + Impact (HOME + Impact)
Occidental College, Tiger Access Program (TAP)
University of Pennsylvania, Penn In Focus (PIF)
Washington University in St. Louis, WashU Preview (Preview)
  • Waitlists:
none
  • Rejections:
Swarthmore College, Discover Swarthmore (DiscoSwat)
Williams College, Windows On Williams (WOW); applied to the first deadline, July 1; received a fee waiver for application and CSS Profile
Additional Information:
Lived in Texas and moved to Virginia in July, might be some sort of geography that worked for me. Accepted to Dartmouth and rejected by Williams while in Texas, rest in Virginia.
Overall, I very happy with my results. I 100% support applying to fly-ins, class of '22. Heavy hitters are past their due date, but great places like Haverford College, Miami University, and the University of Richmond (I think) are still open for a couple of days, it's not too late for you '21s! Even applying gives you a feel of the application process and knowing what does and doesn't work. "Optional" essays are not optional, learned first-hand from Williams, but it's better to learn that early on than later in this cycle. Aside from admissions benefits, fly-in programs are amazing and allow you to explore where you would like to spend the next 4 years of your life. I made this post because fly-ins are hard to research, so this is my contribution.
REA application is due in 5 weeks, yikes. Stay tuned in late March/April for my college results, everyone. Had fun writing this, and one last thing: If you recognize who I am, no you don't :)
submitted by awesomeboy2004 to collegeresults

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